On Retrospectives

Last week I convened a small, cross-functional team for a half hour debrief of the work we’d done together on last month’s Net Neutrality trainings and tweetchat. The trainings and tweetchat were largely successful efforts, but this debrief was to discuss the process of working together.

Here’s how we did it:

  • First I sent around an etherpad with some questions. There was a section for populating a timeline of the entire process from conception to completion. And there were sections for capturing what worked well, and what people felt could be improved upon.
  • As people added their thoughts to the etherpad, it became clear to me that a Vidyo chat would be useful. There were differences of opinion and indications of tension that I felt ought to be surfaced and discussed.
  • Everyone took 30 minutes out of their busy schedules to meet over Vidyo, which I totally appreciated! I started the meeting by stating my goal which was to reach a shared agreement about two or three concrete things we would try to do more of or less of in the future.
  • I would have loved to have had a full hour, as I felt we were just starting to surface the real issues near the end of the call. It felt a little strange to have to cut off the conversation right when we were getting into it.
  • In the short time we had, we were able to touch on what I think were probably the most salient points from the pad, and everyone had a chance to speak. We also identified four concrete things to do differently in the future. By those measures, I think the debrief was successful.
  • Some additional takeaways were shared via email after the call, and I think everyone is committed to making this the start of an ongoing process of continuous improvement.

I called this a “debrief” because it was a relatively unstructured conversation looking back at the end of a project. In my mind, a debrief is one flavor of a larger category of what I’d call “retrospecting behaviors.”

Here are some thoughts about what makes a good retrospective:

You don’t need to save retrospecting for the end. Retrospectives are different from post-mortems in this way. You can retrospect at any point during a project, and, in fact, for teams that work together consistently, retrospectives can be baked into your regular working rhythm.

First thing’s first: start with a neutral timeline. It’s amazing how much we can forget. Spend a couple minutes re-creating an objective timeline of what happened leading up to the retrospective. Use calendars, emails, blog posts, etc. to re-create the major milestones that occurred.

Bring data. If possible, the facilitator should bring data or solicit data from the team. Data can include so many things! Here are just a few examples:

  • Quantitative and qualitative measures of success.
  • Data about how long things took to finish.
  • Subjective experiences: each team member’s high point and low point. One word or phrase from each team member describing their experience.

Be ready for the awkward. For a breakthrough to happen, you often have to go through something uncomfortable first. No one should feel unsafe or attacked, of course, but transformation happens when people have the courage to speak and hear painful truths. Not every retrospective will feel like a group therapy session, but surfacing tensions in productive, solution-oriented ways is good for teams.

Despite their name, retrospectives are about the future. The outcome of any retrospective (whether it’s a team meeting, or 5 minutes of solo thinking time at your desk) should be at least one specific thing you’d like to do differently in the future. Make it visible to you and your teammates.

A “Do Differently” is a specific and immediately actionable experiment. Commit to trying something different just for a week. Because the risk is low (it’s just a week!), you can try something pretty dramatic. Choose something you can start right away.  “Let’s try using Trello for a week” or “Let’s see if having a 10-minute check-in each morning reduces confusion.”

Retrospectives often also inspire one-time actions and new rules. One-time actions are things like, “We need to do a CRM training for the team” or “We should update our list of vendors because no one knew who to call when we ran into trouble.” New rules are things like, “We should start every project with a kick-off meeting, no matter how small the project is.”

Both one-time actions and new rules are important, and should be captured and assigned a responsible person. But they are not the same as “Do Differentlys” which are meant to create a culture of experimentation that is necessary for continuous improvement.

It’s not about how well you followed a process; it’s about how well the process is serving the goals. This is another difference between retrospectives and post-mortems. Whereas in a post-mortem, you might be discussing what you did “right” and “wrong” (i.e. how well you adhered to some agreed upon rules or norms), in a retrospective you discuss what “worked” and “didn’t work” (which might lead to changing those norms).

Celebrate. Retrospectives are occasions to recognize the good as well as the bad. I won’t lie. Some of my favorite retrospectives involved cake.

What would you add to or change about the above list?

Maker Party Engagement: Weeks 6 and 7

Weeks 6 and 7!

tl;dr highlights:

  • ~60K new Webmaker account holders coming from the snippet (including the wildly successful hackable snippet) and the new landing pages (see Adam’s recent post on the month-long process of refining that entire funnel)
  • new user experience for partners and others is in the works
  • starting to see some results from paid media

Overall stats:

  • Contributors: 5996 (up from 5552 two weeks ago)
  • Webmaker accounts: 174.4 (up from 124K two weeks ago)
  • Events: 2238 (up from 1799 two weeks ago)
  • Hosts: 605 (up from 493 two weeks ago)
  • Expected attendees: 108,500 (up from 76,200 two weeks ago)
  • Cities: 403 (up from 362 two weeks ago)

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Engagement Strategy #1: PARTNER OUTREACH

Over the past couple weeks, we started focusing on a new experience for partners—this will allow us to walk a potential partner through the process of creating an event on the platform using a “choose your own adventure” style wizard with three event types. (The etherpad where the experience is being sketched out is here.)

Though we started this work with partners in mind, we’ve realized it can potentially be used by other Webmaker users (see Earned Media section below.)

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Engagement Strategy #2: ACTIVE MOZILLIANS

Helping the FSA community managers track FSA involvement in Maker Party is in the works: https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1061753

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Engagement Strategy #3: OWNED MEDIA

Snippet Funnel:

Adam has a fantastic post summarizing learnings from our snippet funnel work so far. His main takeaway regarding process:

Prioritize time and permission for testing, with a clear shared objective, and get just enough people together who can make the work happen.

Adam and Andrea already reported on the success of the hackable snippet, which increased our end-to-end conversion rate significantly. The hackable snippet will be replaced soon (due to the typical “snippet fatigue” that we always see), but we are now motivated to try similar experiments in the future.

Here are some highlights from the Twitterverse:
Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 1.42.01 PM
Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 1.43.20 PM
Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 1.44.21 PM
Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 1.45.22 PM
The new user experience for partners described in the Partners section above may be re-purposed as the end of this funnel. In the meantime, we released a temporary page that we hope will funnel people towards an immediate contribution. The page asks people to pledge to teach someone about the web. In the first three days, nearly 3,000 people made the pledge.

Suggestion: let’s be sure to begin this work earlier in the 2015 Maker Party campaign, so that we can best take advantage of the snippet traffic during the campaign.

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Engagement Strategy #4: EARNED MEDIA

Press:

The hackable snippet got a mention from Cory Doctorow: http://boingboing.net/2014/08/27/firefoxs-new-start-page-is-a.html

The Buenos Aires Media Party got quite a bit of press. Here’s some of what we know about:

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PAID MEDIA (we’ve never considered this a major strategy for Maker Party)

Several weeks ago, Adam made some changes to our Google AdWords campaign that seem to have had a bit of an impact on results. After weeks of seeing miniscule click-through rates, we finally saw some movement when we shifted the ad target to the United Kingdom and India.  A generic ad promoting Webmaker (not Maker Party) has generated 4,679 click-throughs and and 92 new accounts so far.

This is still a minor channel for us, but it’s good to know that we can generate some interest with our AdWords grant.

Maker Party Engagement Week 5

Week 5!

tl;dr highlights of the week:

  • Though we saw significant jumps in Wm accounts and events, our Contributor numbers did not increase accordingly
  • We’re identifying many opportunities from the partner calls
  • Hack the Snippet is coming soon, along with the next iteration of the snippet funnel
  • The TweetChat created a temporary increase in Twitter engagement, but took attention away from press

Overall stats:

  • Contributors: 5552 (2% increase from last week’s 5441)
  • Webmaker accounts: 124K (17% increase from last week’s 106.3K)
  • Events: 1799 (crazy 50% jump from last week’s 1199)
  • Hosts: 493 (10% increase from last week’s 450)
  • Expected attendees: 76,200  (23% increase from 61,910)
  • Cities: 362 (40% increase from 260 – what caused this jump?)
  • Traffic: here’s the last three weeks. We continue to see the major boost from the snippet.
 

traffic

  • And the Webmaker user account conversion rate increased a bit further:
 

conversion

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Engagement Strategy #1: PARTNER OUTREACH

We are learning a lot from the partner calls. Here are some of the most salient takeaways (borrowing from Amira and Melissa’s notes during Friday’s call):

Partner trends
  • Partners see value in badging their event mentors, speakers and volunteers as a form of appreciation. But there is a potential for those who receive the badges to have no idea who is badging them or what it means (lack of connection to MP). Opportunity: We need to better explain to people why they’ve received a badge and why they might want to create a Webmaker account.
  • Partners are doing things but we just haven’t captured them.  Opportunity: We need to offer real value to users in order to increase the amount of sharing/broadcasting/badging that happens through the site. 
  • Some people need way more training — Opportunity: this is where the event wizard might play a role; there also might be an opportunity to run TTT within certain orgs and spaces.
  • We need to clarify our value statement for partners. It may not be in  adding numbers to their events or traction to their programs/site, or getting press for non-Hive partners. Instead it may be in providing resources and curriculum. We can better segment partners into affinity groups (e.g. afterschool programs) and provide content, trainings, resources, CTAs specifically for them.  We can also localize those offerings to reduce hand-holding.
  • People don’t understand how broad our definition of Maker Party is: everyday events, small events, stands/booths/tables within other events — have to push them to realize that and include all of these on the events platform (note from HK: I would argue we have to offer them a reason to)
  • Opportunity: There’s the summer wave and back to school waves. We need to have strategies and actions towards both.
  • Challenges:
    • Age and time continue to be a blocker for new Wm accounts.
    • Mass emails to order swag, upload events, share information just didn’t work. They need 1-to-1.
    • We lost interest by a lot of people along the way. There’s a good 20-30% we will not be able to bring back in.
    • Parties sound like fun kid-like things (making toys etc.)
    • Getting the Maker Party logo/brand included in event promotion in a meaningful way is not happening, and the meaning behind the brand seems to cause confusion in some cases.

PROMOTIONAL PARTNERS: We continue to see only a tiny amount of referrals from promotional partner urls with RIDs.

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Engagement Strategy #2: ACTIVE MOZILLIANS

Haven’t heard anything this week, but Amira and I are meeting with the FSA Community Manager on Monday of this week.

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Engagement Strategy #3: OWNED MEDIA

Snippet Funnel:

The snippet funnel continues to perform well in terms of driving traffic. We’re aiming to beat a baseline 1.8% conversion rate.

We were a bit blocked by technical issues this week and weren’t able to release the new tailored account signup pages, but we continue to work on that.

The “hack the snippet” test was delayed, but will be live soon. We have a comms strategy around it (for after it’s been tested).

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Engagement Strategy #4: EARNED MEDIA

Press this week:

Aside from a cross-post of last week’s Washington Post Magazine story (http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/workinglife/want-a-tech-job-what-to-study-in-a-fast-moving-field/2193050), we didn’t see press this week. We were focused on our Net Neutrality tweetchat instead.

SOCIAL (not one of our key strategies):

As expected, the Tweetchat temporarily increased our Twitter engagement for a two-day period—we saw double the usual amount of favorites, retweets, and replies. You can view the Storify here: https://storify.com/mozilla/net-neutrality-tweet-chat-from-mozilla-s-teaminter

The #MakerParty trendline for this week is back up to where it had been two weeks ago: 

trend

 

See #MakerParty tweets here: https://twitter.com/search?q=%23makerparty

1/3 of a year

Four Months (just remembered this blog is for (H)an(n)a(h)grams, so: Fonts Humor)

I’ve been here for four months. I think the famous Mozilla firehose is finally starting to slow down. A main difference between me now and me three months ago is that now, on most days, I actually know how to do the things on my ToDo list. SuperBonus: I can usually follow what’s happening in meetings now!

Significantly, I’m starting to add things to my ToDo list that are more than just the bare minimum of program maintenance. I’m starting to understand where I might be able to innovate and add value.

About a month after I started, I inherited the job of maintaining @Mozilla social channels, and about a month after that, I inherited the job of managing the relationship with our Maker Party PR company. Together these things took up a good chunk of my time over the past two months, largely because they’re outside my area of expertise (I helped launch a social media program at my last job, but that was back when Twitter was brand spankin’ new, and things have changed tremendously since then).

While I think both of these tasks ended up providing me with a great platform for learning about the organization (I have to know what’s going on so I can tweet about it!), I am looking forward to focusing more intently on the aspects of the program manager job I feel I’ve been neglecting.

I Feel Good (I Do Elf Ego)

Some of the things I feel good about from the past few months:

  • I think the Maker Party engagement updates and analyses (some of which I’ve posted on this blog) have been helpful in sparking some good conversation at our daily “Peace Room” meetings. Also, charts make me seem smart.
  • Our Salesforce for Partners implementation is a tiny bit behind schedule, but I feel good about where we are in the process. I was glad to be able to take this partially off of others’ plates and share the burden, because no one should have to face Salesforce alone.
  • Working with Dave, Erika, Mavis, and Sabrina on the Advocacy site has been a pleasure, and I think the end product is going to be great.
  • Yesterday’s Tweetchat was pretty fun.

Can Do Better (rent taco bed)

Some things I want to work on in the months ahead:

  • I want to operationalize what it means to be a Clockmaster, and refine the suite of tools we use to manage our work. Now that we have Sprinter, I feel a lot better about Bugzilla (which, I admit, I headdesked about for the first couple months I was here). But I don’t think it fully meets our needs, so we’ll need to supplement with other tools and processes.
  • I want to help reduce the pain in our grant reporting process. Gettin’ paid shouldn’t hurt so bad.
  • I want to crack the nut of social media. I was inspired by a recent conversation with Michaela Smiley, and I believe we can do a much better job of engaging and serving our community, while also better expressing the Mozilla brand and growing the Webmaker community. Hashtag win.
  • I want to make sure Maker Party 2015 is even more full of awesome by capturing and acting upon our learnings from this year. In general, I’d like to help create a culture of reflection and continuous improvement. Not to get too existential, but isn’t this what life is about? </insight into hannah’s worldview>
  • I want to improve our systems for distributing knowledge across the organization. I’ve seen really good examples of this (Andrea’s email-fu workshop, the Fundraising workshops that happened a few months ago, Geoffrey’s trendlines workshop from this morning, and probably many more). I don’t think Encyclopedia BestPractica is working as a tool for knowledge sharing, so I’d like to come up with something that meets people where they are (rather than making them come find it).
  • I want to keep improving our cross-team collaboration. Even in my short time here, I’ve already seen great strides in this, but there’s more to do. This project brief template is one of my first direct efforts toward that, in addition to just building relationships with many of my super rad co-workers.

Finally, I just want send a big ol’ shout out to said co-workers for making my first third of a year so enjoyable.

Onward!

Maker Party Engagement Week 4

We’re almost at the halfway point!

Here’s some fodder for this week’s Peace Room meetings.

tl;dr potential topics of discussion:

  • big increase in user accounts this week caused by change to snippet strategy
    • From Adam: We’re directing all snippet traffic straight to webmaker.org/signup while we develop a tailored landing page experience with built in account creation.This page is really converting well for an audience as broad and cold as the snippet, and I believe we can increase this rate further with bespoke pages and optimization.

      Fun fact: this approach is generating a typical month’s worth of new webmaker users every three days.

  • what do we want from promotional partners?
  • what are we doing to engage active Mozillians?

——–

Overall stats:

  • Contributors: 5441 (we’ve passed the halfway point!)
  • Webmaker accounts: 106.3K (really big jump this week—11.6K new accounts this week as compared to 2.6K last week) (At one point we thought that 150K Webmaker accounts would be the magic number for hitting 10K Contributors. Should we revisit that assumption?)
  • Events: 1199 (up 10% from last week; this is down from the previous week which saw a 26% jump)
  • Hosts: 450 (up 14% from last week, same as the prior week)
  • Expected attendees: 61,910 (up 13% from last week, down a little bit from last week’s 16% increase)
  • Cities: 260 (up 8% from 241 last week)
  • Traffic: here’s the last three weeks. You can see we’re maintaining the higher levels that started with last week’s increase to our snippet allotment. ​ ​

traffic

  • The Webmaker user account conversion rate also went up this week:

Screen Shot 2014-08-10 at 4.50.50 PM

  • Do we know what caused the improved conversion rate?

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Engagement Strategy #1: PARTNER OUTREACH

EVENT PARTNERS: This week we started implementing our phone-based “hand holding” strategy. We’re tracking finding from partner calls on a spreadsheet and capturing learnings on an etherpad.

Notes:

  • as I understand it, we need to populate the Potential Contributors column with numbers (not words) to inform the expected Contributors trend line
  • same for the Potential Accounts column
  • are we using the Potential Events column to inform a trend line on any dashboard?
  • oh, and let’s agree on a format convention for the date field, so that we can sort by date

PROMOTIONAL PARTNERS: It still looks like we’re only getting handfuls of referrals through the specific partner URLs. I’d like to clarify what exactly our goals are for promotional partners, so that we can figure out whether to focus more attention on tracking results.

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Engagement Strategy #2: ACTIVE MOZILLIANS

I haven’t heard anything about engaging Reps or FSAs this week. Have we done anything on this front?

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Engagement Strategy #3: OWNED MEDIA

Snippet:

The snippet continues to perform well in terms of driving traffic. Last week we sent the first of the drip campaign emails and saw the following results after the first two days:

  • Sent to 75,964
  • Unique opens 13187
  • Open rate 17%
  • Unique clicks 4004
  • Open to click rate 30%
  • New accounts 554
  • Email to account conversion 0.73%
  • Click to conversion 13.84%

The snippet working group met and agreed to build the following two iterations:

  • Survey without email > 2 x tailored account signup pages > ongoing journey
  • Immediate account signup page > ongoing journey

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Engagement Strategy #4: EARNED MEDIA

Press this week:

We revised our strategy with Turner this week. See previous email on that topic.

Brand awareness

Here’s this week’s traffic coming from searches for “webmaker” and “maker party” (blue line) vs. the week before (orange line). There’s been a 28% increase (though the overall numbers are quite small).

Screen Shot 2014-08-10 at 5.41.34 PMSOCIAL (not one of our key strategies): #MakerParty trendline: Back down a bit this week. ​

Screen Shot 2014-08-10 at 5.45.58 PMSee #MakerParty tweets here: https://twitter.com/search?q=%23makerparty&src=typd

Maker Party Engagement: Week 2

Two weeks in!

Let’s check in on our four engagement strategies.

First, some overall stats:

  • Events: 862 (up nearly 60% from the 541 we had last week, and more than a third of the way towards our goal of 2400)
  • Hosts: 347 (up >50% from 217 last week)
  • Expected attendees: 46,885 (up >75% from 25,930 last week)
  • Cities: 216 (goal is 450)

Note: I’ll start doing trend lines on these numbers soon, so we can see the overall shape.

Are there other things we should be tracking? For example, we have a goal of 70,000 Makes created through new user accounts, but I’m not sure if we have a way to easily get those numbers.

  • Webmaker accounts: 91,998 (I’m assuming “Users” on this dash is the number of account holders)
  • Contributors: If I understand the contributors dashboard correctly, we’re at 4,615, with 241 new this week.
  • Traffic: here’s the last three weeks. You can see we’re maintaining about the same levels as last week.

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Engagement Strategy #1: PARTNER OUTREACH

  • # of confirmed event partners: 205 (5 new this week)
  • # of confirmed promotional partners: 63 (2 new this week)

We saw press releases/blog posts from these partners:

We also started engaging Net Neutrality partners by inviting them to join our global teach-ins.

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Engagement Strategy #2: ACTIVE MOZILLIANS

  • Science Lab Global Sprint happened this week—I don’t yet know the total # of people who participated
  • Lots of event uploads this week from the Hive networks.

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Engagement Strategy #3: OWNED MEDIA

  • Snippet: The snippet has generated nearly 350M impressions, >710K clicks, and >40,000 email sign-ups to date. We’ve nearly finalized some additional animal-themed icons to help prevent snippet fatigue, and have started drafting a two-email drip series for people who’ve provided their emails via the snippet (see the relevant bug).
  • Mozilla.org: In the first few days since the new Maker Party banner went live we saw a significant drop in Webmaker account conversions (as compared to the previous Webmaker focused banner). One likely cause is that, in addition to changing the banner itself, we also changed the target destination from Webmaker to Maker Party. We’ve rolled back the banner and target destination to the previous version, and are discussing iteration ideas here.

Analysis: We’ve learned quite a bit about which snippets perform best. The real test will be how many email sign-ups we can convert to Webmaker account holders.

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Engagement Strategy #4: EARNED MEDIA

Planting seeds:

  • Mark had an interview with Press Trust of India, India’s premier news agency that has the largest press outreach in Asia.
  • Brett had an interview with The Next Web

TV/Video:

English:

What are the results of earned media efforts?

Here’s traffic coming from searches for “webmaker” and “maker party.” No boost here yet.

—–

SOCIAL (not one of our key strategies):

#MakerParty trendline: You can see the spike we saw last week has tapered off.


See #MakerParty tweets here: https://twitter.com/search?q=%23makerparty&src=typd

Some highlights:

Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 3.11.53 PM Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 3.12.27 PM Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 3.12.58 PM Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 3.13.49 PM Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 3.14.19 PM Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 3.15.59 PM Screen Shot 2014-07-23 at 3.35.32 PMScreen Shot 2014-07-24 at 4.06.45 PM

 

Maker Party Engagement: Week 1

Maker Party is here!

Last week Geoffrey sent out the Maker Party Marketing Plan and outlined the four strategies we’re using to engage the community in our annual campaign to teach the web.

Let’s see how we’re doing in each of those four areas.

First, some overall stats:

  • Events: 541 as of this writing (with more to be uploaded soon)
  • Hosts: 217 as of this writing
  • Expected attendees: 25,930 as of this writing
  • Contributors: See Adam’s post
  • Traffic: see the image below, which shows traffic to Webmaker.org during the last month. The big spike at the end of June/early July corresponds to the launch of the snippet. You can see another smaller spike at the launch of Maker Party itself.

Screen Shot 2014-07-20 at 9.29.00 AM

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Engagement Strategy #1: PARTNER OUTREACH

  • # of confirmed event partners: 200 as of this writing
  • # of confirmed promotional partners: 61 as of this writing

We can see from analytics on the RIDs that Web 2.0 Labs/Learning Revolution and National 4H are the leading partners in terms of generating traffic to Webmaker.org. Links attributed to them generated 140 and 68 sessions, respectively.

Additionally, we saw blog posts from these partners:

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Engagement Strategy #2: ACTIVE MOZILLIANS

  • Appmaker trainings happened at Cantinas in MozSpaces around the world last Thursday. Waiting to hear a tally of how many Mozillians were engaged through those events.
  • You’ve probably seen the event reports on the Webmaker listserve from Reps and Mentors around the world who are throwing Maker Parties.
  • Hives are in full effect! Lots of event uploads this week from the Hive networks.

Note re: metrics—though there’s evidence of a lot of movement within this strategy, I’m not quite sure how to effectively measure it. Would love to brainstorm with others.

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Engagement Strategy #3: OWNED MEDIA

  • Snippet: The snippet has generated nearly 300M impressions, ~610K clicks, and ~33,500 email sign-ups to date. We now have a solid set of baseline data for the initial click-through rate, and will shift our focus to learning as much as we can about what happens after the initial click. We are working on creating several variants of the most successful icon/copy combination to avoid snippet fatigue. Captured email addresses will be a part of an engagement email campaign moving forward.
  • Mozilla.org: The Maker Party banner went live on July 16 in EN, FR, DE, and es-ES. So far there’s been no correlative spike in traffic, but it’s too early to draw any conclusions about its effectiveness.

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Engagement Strategy #4: EARNED MEDIA

Our partners at Turner4D have set up several interviews for Mark and Chris as well as Mozillians in Uganda and Kenya.

Radio

Print

English:

Indonesian:

German:

Spanish:

Importantly, Maker Party was included in a Dear Colleague Letter to 435 members of the U.S. Congress this week.

What are the results of earned media efforts?

None of the press we’ve received so far can be directly correlated with a bump in traffic. Because press, when combined with social media and word of mouth, can increase general brand awareness of Mozilla and Maker Parties, one of the data points we are tracking is traffic coming from searches for brand terms like “webmaker” and “maker party.” The graph below shows a spike in that kind of searching the day before the launch, followed by a return to more average levels.

Screen Shot 2014-07-20 at 10.13.35 AM
SOCIAL:

We do not consider social media to be a key part of our strategy to draw in contributors, but it is a valuable supplement to our other efforts, as it allows us to amplify and respond to the community voice.

You can see a big spike in mentions on this #MakerParty trendline: trendline

See #MakerParty tweets here: https://twitter.com/search?q=%23makerparty&src=typd

Some highlights:

tweet1 tweet2 tweet3 tweet4 tweet5 tweet6 tweet7That’s all for this week. Stay tuned. The analysis will get deeper as we collect more data.